East Tennessee State University ETSU Digital Media

Curriculum

B.S. Digital Media


General Education.  In the three digital media concentrations, each student takes courses in General Education. The General Education classes are part of every bachelors degree and ensure that students are exposed to different areas to develop a well rounded education. These classes help students develop advanced reading, writing and speaking skills, in addition to exposure to the arts and humanities.

General Education Classes

ENGL 1010 Critical Reading and Expository Writing

Writing paragraphs and essays based on close readings of various texts, with an emphasis on clear, grammatically correct expository prose. Students must take this course during the first eligible semester at the university. Students must earn a grade of “C” or above to pass this course. These courses do no assign grades C-, D+, or D.

ENGL 1020 Critical Thinking and Argumentation

Prerequisites: ENGL 1010 or equivalent. Writing essays based on critical analyses of various literary texts. Emphasis on sound argumentative techniques. Requires documented research paper. Students must earn a grade of “C” or above to pass this course. These courses do no assign grades C-, D+, or D.

Oral Communication (choose 1)

Literature (choose 1)

Fine Arts Elective (choose 1)

ENTC 3020 Technology & Society

Prerequisites: ENGL 1020. How does technology impact society and one’s daily life? Historical aspects of the development of technology beginning with Stone Age peoples through the Industrial Revolution, to modern concepts. An atmosphere where group discussions struggle with some of the dilemmas of modern life. (fall, spring, summer)

Social/Behavioral Sciences (choose 1)

Social/Behavioral Sciences (choose 1)

HIST 2010 The United States to 1877

A survey of the settlement and development of the colonies, the revolutionary period, the making of the Constitution, the diplomatic, economic, and political problems of the new government, the nature of economic sectionalism, Jacksonian democracy, territorial expansion, the Civil War, and Reconstruction.

HIST 2020 The United States since 1877

Growth of the United States as an industrial and world power since Reconstruction.

MATH 1530 Probability and Statistics – Noncalculus

Prerequisites: Two years of high school algebra. Descriptive statistics and its relevance, including probability, experimentation, measurement, sampling and surveys, informal statistical inference, and hypothesis testing are included.

PHYS 2010 General Physics I Noncalculus

A survey of the topics in classical physics intended primarily for students in preprofessional curricula and majors in various engineering technology concentrations. (Engineering transfer students should take PHYS 2110.) Topics include mechanics, solids, fluids, and thermodynamics. A good working knowledge of algebra and trigonometry (at least at the high school level) is required before taking this course. Heavy emphasis is made for the solutions to numerical problems. PHYS 2010 is the first semester of a two-semester sequence in general physics. (Many curricula require a laboratory course in physics. Students in these curricula must also take PHYS 2011.) Three hours of lecture each week.

PHYS 2011 General Physics Laboratory I-Noncalculus

Experiments dealing with the basic laws of physics, designed to reinforce and supplement concepts learned in PHYS 2010. A good working knowledge of algebra and trigonometry (at least at the high school level) is required before taking this course. One (2) two-hour lab each week. Note: Lecture courses requiring a lab can be taken together or separately, but must both be completed by graduation.

CHEM 1110 General Chemistry

Corequistes: CHEM 1111. The basic course for students who expect to major in chemistry, as well as those who wish to meet entrance requirements of professional schools. Three (3) hours of lecture-recitation per week. A common grade will be given.

CHEM 1111 General Chemistry Laboratory I

Corequistes: CHEM 1110. One (3) three-hour lab per week. A common grade will be given.

CSCI 1100 Using Information Technology

Students will gain a working knowledge of word-processing, spreadsheets, electronic communication, and online database searching and will learn the skills necessary to integrate electronic information from various sources. Students learn through both lecture and hands-on experience. (fall, spring, summer)

Digital Media Core.  The Digital Media Core is required by all digital media majors, regardless of concentration. These classes develop skills required of professionals across all areas of digital media. The last class in this series, Portfolio Development (DIGM4930) prepares students to transition from college life to professional life by working on resumes, cover letters, presentation skills, and most importantly: developing a professional digital media portfolio.

Digital Media Core

ENTC 1510 Student in University

This course is meant to provide guidance to first-year university students as they begin their search for directions to take in self-definition, intellectual growth, career choices, and life skills. (fall, spring)

DIGM 1100 Visual Thinking

An introduction to the problems, principles, and process involved in the ideation, conceptual design, and verbal/visual communication of media solutions. In this course students will learn to apply design thinking skills, rapid visualization techniques, and design process templates to define, design, and develop a comprehensive project proposal, product, and implementation plan. Fundamental to this course is the development of drawing skills using traditional media to thumbnail, draw, and diagram the information, visual interfaces, and user interactions associated with project/product design solutions. Lecture and lab. (fall, spring)

ARTA 1110 2D Design

A fundamental exploration of the elements of two-dimensional art (line, shape, texture, value, and color) and their relationship to the principles of design (balance, rhythm, variety, and unity). Stress is placed on visual thinking through the use of problem-solving structures.

ARTA 1204 Color Theory

Prerequisites: ARTA 1110 or ARTA 1201; or permission of instructor. An introduction to the basic principles of color theory as related to the visual arts to include both additive and subtractive color systems. An exploration of a variety of media and processes which stresses the use of a problem-solving structure.

MATH 1720 Pre-Calculus (Trigonometry)

Prerequisites: Two years of high school algebra, MATH 1710, or the equivalent. A study of functions and their graphs, including polynomial and rational functions, exponential and logarithmic functions, and trigonometric functions.

DIGM 1640 Vector-Based Imaging

Prerequisite or corequisite: DIGM 1100; or permission of instructor.Study of vector-based image production with particular emphasis on postscript illustration and communication. Both technical and design considerations that work to improve the student’s ability to communicate graphically will be addressed. This class features a combination of graphic production projects, critiques, readings, and discussions. Lecture and lab. (fall, spring)

DIGM 1650 Raster-Based Imaging

Prerequisite or corequisite: DIGM 1100; or permission of instructor. Study of digital imaging and processing as related to modern industrial problems. Areas of study will include a review of historical methods of manipulating images compared with recent innovations in technology and the use of digital formats. Image design, color usage, and computer-based production of both traditional and digital publications will be studied. Lecture and lab. (fall, spring)

DIGM 3000 Principles of Interaction

Prerequisites: DIGM 1650, DIGM 1640, ARTA 1110 or permission of the instructor Prerequisite(s) or Corequisite(s): ARTA 1204. This course provides practical and theoretical knowledge in interactive development. Through lectures and studio application of the underlying interactive principles, the student will experience, and gain a comprehensive understanding of interactive project planning, media components, interactive delivery systems, information architecture, usability, user interface design, and interactive application development. Principles governing critical analysis of interactive content and graphical design will be emphasized. (fall, spring)

DIGM 3010 Principles of Visualization

Prerequisites: DIGM 1640, DIGM 1650, ARTA 1110 or permission of the instructor Prerequisite(s) or Corequisite(s): ARTA 1204. This course provides practical and theoretical knowledge in visualization. Through lectures and studio application of the underlying principles, students will gain a comprehensive understanding of visualization as follows: modeling, lighting, surface rendering, animation, and digital video exporting. Lecture and lab. (fall, spring)

ENTC 3030 Technical Communication

Prerequisites: ENGL 1010 and ENGL 1020. A comprehensive study of technical and professional communication in written and oral form. Covers rhetorical principles and their application in a variety of types of business correspondence, reports, and technical/scientific documents. Lecture and classroom exercises. (fall, spring, summer)

DIGM 4930 Portfolio Development for Digital Media

Prerequisites: Senior status and within two (2) semesters of completing all requirements for graduation. Permission of instructor is required. This course provides the opportunity to review and refine selected examples of work for the creation of a digital media portfolio. Topics include industry research, job searching techniques, interview preparation, group projects, presentation skills, and portfolio development and refinement. Lecture and lab. (fall, spring)

Concentration Requirements.   Each concentration gives students the opportunity to specialize in an area of digital media.  Each concentration includes required classes and electives.  The electives need to be chosen with faculty and the digital media advisor.

Digital Animation Concentration


This concentration gives students the background necessary to animate in any media/software with strong skills in one of several specialty areas of animation, such as character animation and special effects animation. Students in the animation concentration would typically be aiming for careers in 3D animation, 2D animation, motion graphics, character animation, and technical direction.

ARTA 1201 Drawing Fundamentals

An introductory drawing course based primarily on direct observation techniques, analysis, basic pictorial composition, and spatial organization. An exploration of a variety of subject matter, media, processes, and attitudes as related to drawing and the visual arts.

ARTA 2120 Basic Figure Drawing

Prerequisites: ARTA 1110, ARTA 1201, ARTA 1204, or permission of instructor. An introductory course in drawing in human figure to emphasize observation, proportion, and a more intuitive approach to human anatomy. Students will work directly from the skeleton and models to analyze the figure and explore a variety of media and pictorial problems.

ARTA 2120 Basic Figure Drawing

Prerequisites: ARTA 1110, ARTA 1201, ARTA 1204, or permission of instructor. An introductory course in drawing in human figure to emphasize observation, proportion, and a more intuitive approach to human anatomy. Students will work directly from the skeleton and models to analyze the figure and explore a variety of media and pictorial problems.

THEA 2510 Acting I

An introductory acting terminology and technique course, utilizing exercises, improvisations, research, and scene study.

DIGM 2870 Animation Fundamentals

Prerequisites: DIGM 1100, DIGM 1640, and ARTA 1201; or permission of instructor. Study of the fundamental principles and mechanics of motion through hand-drawn animation. Students explore timing, spacing, and staging an image for clarity, gravity, emotion and storytelling, and learn to apply and manipulate the fundamental concepts to creatively animate an idea. The coursework will serve as a foundation for comprehending the underlying principles and mechanics for any form of animation. Lecture and lab. (fall, spring)

DIGM 2900 Motion Tools I: Editing

Prerequisites: DIGM 1100, DIGM 1650 or permission of instructor. Study of file-based digital video basics including basic compositing and an overview of the motion production process. Topics include pre-production, storyboarding, audio/video capture, editing of raw content into multi-layered final products, post-production processing of audio/video files for various delivery scenarios, and a review of historical motion picture and motion graphics production compared with recent technology innovations in the production process. Lecture and lab. (fall, spring)

DIGM 3130 3D Animation

Prerequisites: DIGM 3010 and DIGM 2870. Study of 3-D as it relates to the basic principles of animation. Students will learn to create believable and natural animations using a combination of several different techniques including inverse kinematics (IK), forward kinematics (FK), bones, morphing, and keyframing. Lecture and lab. (spring)

DIGM 4147/4146 Fundamentals of Character Animation

Prerequisites: DIGM 2870, DIGM 3010, ARTA 1201, ARTA 1204 or permission of instructor. Corequistes: DIGM 4146. This course emphasizes the practical and theoretical principles of character animation. Students will explore how to put personality into characters and develop skills to create characters that act. The exercises will provide a foundation for comprehending the underlying techniques for capturing expression of emotions in animation. (spring)



Choose one of the following:

DIGM 3110 3D Model Design

Prerequisites: DIGM 3010, ARTA 1204 or permission of instructor.Working with state-of-the art software, this course provides an introduction to 3-D model design. Students will learn how to utilize modeling techniques and applications to gain a basic understanding of NURBS, polygon, and subdivision surfaces to design organized virtual models. Lecture and lab. (fall, spring)

DIGM 3120 3D Lighting and Rendering

Prerequisites: DIGM 3010, ARTA 1204, or permission of instructor. This course provides a practical and theoretical understanding of lighting, rendering, and setting up cameras in a 3-D virtual environment. Students will learn how to utilize a number of texturing and mapping techniques, rendering applications, and gain a basic understanding of rendering effects, and specific output issues. Areas of emphasis include shading models, 2-D bitmap, and 3-D procedural texture types, solid and surface mapping types, and techniques for creating stylized and realistic textures. Lecture and lab. (fall)



Choose one of the following:

DIGM 4817/4816 3D Effects Animation

Prerequisites: DIGM 3130, DIGM 2900, or permission of instructor. Corequistes: DIGM 4816.This production course focuses on dynamic animation strategies to visualize physical phenomena. Students will explore rigid and soft bodies, particle animation, and rendering in both theory and practice. Additional topics include techniques involving instancing geometry with particle motion, basic fluid dynamics, cloth simulation, and dynamic constraints. (fall)

DIGM 4887/4886 Technical Direction for Animation

Prerequisites: DIGM 3130 or permission of instructor. Corequistes: DIGM 4886. This course will explore advanced digital character animation techniques. Course topics include character setup, inverse kinematics, joints and bones systems, deformers, scripting and set driven key set-up. There will be an emphasis on effective character set-up procedures and scripting workflow. (spring)



Choose one of the following:

DIGM 34647/4646 Advanced Animation

Prerequisites: DIGM 2870, DIGM 3010, ARTA 1110, ARTA 1201, ARTA 1204, or permission of instructor. Corequistes: DIGM 4646. A study in advanced animation techniques. Topics may include, but are not limited to, animation procedures with a focus on motion, timing and storytelling.

DIGM 4957 Special Topics: Digital Media Production

Special Topics of current interest to groups of students concerning content not presented in regular course offerings. May be repeated for credit if material covered is significantly different or advanced. (fall, spring)

 

The Digital Animation concentration also has 4 credit hours of Digital Media electives. Electives are courses related to your concentration that you select in consultation with the DIGM Advisor and Faculty. All electives must be approved by the department.


Digital Visualization Concentration


This concentration gives students the background necessary to create dimensional digital models that solve visual problems and provide solutions for both the physical and virtual worlds. Students in this concentration would typically be preparing for careers in product design, architecture, interior design, entertainment, gaming, and data visualization.

ARTA 1201 Drawing Fundamentals

An introductory drawing course based primarily on direct observation techniques, analysis, basic pictorial composition, and spatial organization. An exploration of a variety of subject matter, media, processes, and attitudes as related to drawing and the visual arts.

ENTC 2170 CADD

Fundamentals of engineering drawing and sketching: orthographic projections, dimensioning, tolerancing, and scaling. Introduction to the CAD interface and environment; 2D drawing basics; using object snaps, layers, blocks, dimensioning; introduction to 3D modeling; extrusions, revolves, and rendering. (fall, spring, summer)

DIGM 3110 3D Model Design

Prerequisites: DIGM 3010, ARTA 1204 or permission of instructor. Working with state-of-the art software, this course provides an introduction to 3-D model design. Students will learn how to utilize modeling techniques and applications to gain a basic understanding of NURBS, polygon, and subdivision surfaces to design organized virtual models. Lecture and lab. (fall, spring)

The Digital Visualization concentration also has 16 credit hours of Digital Media electives, and 14 hours of related electives.  While DIGM electives must be courses within the major discipline, related electives can come from other disciplines including Technology, Art, Computer Science, Communications, Business and Theater. All electives must be approved by the department.


Digital Interaction and Game Design Concentration


This concentration gives students the background necessary to create games and interactive environments with strong skills in one of several specialty areas such as environment design, level design, modeling for games, materials, scripting for interaction, etc. Students in the interaction and game design concentration are typically preparing for careers in the game industry in one of these fields.

CSCI 1250 Intro to Computer Science

Prerequisites: Pass or take CSCI 1100 and MATH 1720 or two years of high school algebra. Students who are required to take developmental math must successfully complete it before taking CSCI 1250. Introduction to all aspects of the programming and problem-solving process and the elements of good programming style. A high-level language will be used as a vehicle for introducing these concepts. Laboratory use of the computer in designing, coding, debugging, and executing programs is an integral part of the course. (fall, spring)

DIGM 3110 3D Model Design

Prerequisites: DIGM 3010, ARTA 1204 or permission of instructor. Working with state-of-the art software, this course provides an introduction to 3-D model design. Students will learn how to utilize modeling techniques and applications to gain a basic understanding of NURBS, polygon, and subdivision surfaces to design organized virtual models. Lecture and lab. (fall, spring)

DIGM 3120 3D Lighting and Rendering

DIGM 3010, ARTA 1204, or permission of instructor. This course provides a practical and theoretical understanding of lighting, rendering, and setting up cameras in a 3-D virtual environment. Students will learn how to utilize a number of texturing and mapping techniques, rendering applications, and gain a basic understanding of rendering effects, and specific output issues. Areas of emphasis include shading models, 2-D bitmap, and 3-D procedural texture types, solid and surface mapping types, and techniques for creating stylized and realistic textures. Lecture and lab. (fall)

DIGM 3530 Game Design

Prerequisites: DIGM 3000 and DIGM 3010 or CSCI 1260 and junior standing or permission of instructor. Introduction to practical techniques and theoretical knowledge for entertainment and serious game design. Topics include multiple game types, first person and role playing games, and medical and tactical simulations. This class emphasizes principles governing critical analysis of level design.

DIGM 3540 Interaction for Game Design

Prerequisites: DIGM 3000 and DIGM 3010 or CSCI 1260 and junior standing or permission of the instructor. An introduction to developing game interaction modifications (modding) for entertainment and serious games, such as first person or role playing games, or medical and tactical simulations. Principles governing critical analysis of level scripting are emphasized.

DIGM 4917 Digital Media Production

Prerequisites: Junior standing and permission of instructor. Application of skills learned in digital media concentrations to create a project for competition, service work or other significant applications. Principles governing critical analysis of production are emphasized.

The Digital Interaction and Game Design concentration also has 8 credit hours of Digital Media electives, and 9 hours of related electives.  While DIGM electives must be courses within the major discipline, related electives can come from other disciplines including Technology, Art, Computer Science, Communications, Business and Theater. All electives must be approved by the department


M.A. in New Media Studio


East Tennessee State University has begun offering a new graduate degree, the Master of Arts in New Media Studio. The course of study provides a bridge connecting traditional art and modern technology through cross-disciplinary learning between the digital media program and the Department of Art and Design.

A 33-credit hour curriculum provides room for students to explore individual interests, with the assistance of faculty from a wide range of backgrounds and experience encompassing studio art, digital media and technological approaches to art.  Through the program, artists with traditional backgrounds in areas such as sculpture, painting, drawing, printmaking, metals and photography are able to expand their knowledge to include emerging techniques, including 3-D animation, gaming, motion capture, visualization, video and special effects, image editing, digital illustration and graphic design.

Graduates of the program would be prepared for careers such as multimedia artists in the fields of commercial, illustration and comic book art, as well as Web, game, graphic or motion graphics designers, animators, art directors or videographers.

According to Dr. Cecilia McIntosh, dean of the ETSU School of Graduate Studies, “ETSU’s ability to create this course of study is assisted by a strong, supportive arts community, in addition to current technology and equipment available for students’ use and experimentation.”

To learn more, visit the program’s Web site at www.etsu.edu/newmedia.


DIGM Minor

In all art and communication disciplines, and in computer science, education, business, and science disciplines, there is a growing need for visual communication tools (such as web sites, animations, video, data or scientific visualization, computer graphics, concept renderings, broadcast and presentation graphics, etc.). Some of the fastest growing industries incorporate the use computer-based production. Students taking the minor will learn skills that will make them more attractive to employers across a wide range of disciplines.

Students from any major that have an interest in Digital Media are welcome. Students from Art & Design, Computer & Information Sciences, Communication, and Engineering Technology should find this minor of particular value as they prepare for their careers.

Students in the minor must take:
DIGM 1100 Visual Thinking
DIGM 1640 Vector-Based Imaging
DIGM 1650 Raster-Based Imaging

And of one of the following:

DIGM 3000 Principles of Interaction
DIGM 3010 Principles of Visualization

Plus 8 hours of guided electives to be chosen with the DIGM Advisor for a total of 24 hours.

Guided elective courses must be chosen from Digital Media courses in consultation with the academic advisor in Digital Media, and approval by the department. No more than 8 hours of credit can be applied to both the student’s major degree and the minor.

Choices include:

DIGM 2821 Desktop Publishing
DIGM 2870 Animation Fundamentals.
DIGM 2900 Motion Tools I: Editing
DIGM 3110 3D Model Design.
DIGM 3120 3D Lighting and Rendering
DIGM 3130 3D Animation.
DIGM 3200 Web Design.
DIGM 3300 Product Design.
DIGM 3400 Interactive Design
DIGM 4147/6 Fundamentals of Character Animation
DIGM 4400 Interactive Development
DIGM 4617/6 Advanced Raster Based Imaging and Lab
DIGM 4627/6 Motion Tools II: Compositing and Lab
DIGM 4817/6 3D Effects Animation and Lab.
DIGM 4827/6 Motion Tools III: Apllication and Lab
DIGM 4887/6 Technical Direction and Lab

Only courses for which a grade of “C” or higher is earned will be accepted to meet the conditions of the minor.